Update: SpaceX Succeeds and Pulls Off A Winning Week

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SpaceX Succeeds, Shakes Off Mid-Week Failures to Finish Strong

When I wrote and posted yesterday’s piece on SpaceX’s woes this week, things looked bleak for the Falcon 9 relaunch. Further, there was little information available about the Starhopper failure. Today, however, the company can stand proud. Yesterday, just after I posted doom and gloom predictions about the Falcon launch, the rocket left the earth. Astronauts aboard the ISS await its arrival on Saturday. On top of that, just a few hours later, the company successfully retested its Starhopper prototype in its first untethered hop. So there ya’ go. I predict failure, and SpaceX succeeds. 

Let’s Start with Starhopper

Starhopper, SpaceX’s prototype vehicle for its ambitious Starship program, suffered a failure on the launchpad Wednesday. They bounced back Thursday evening, however. The prototype succeeded in its first untethered hop test. It reached an altitude of 20 meters and landed safely shortly after. The test took place at SpaceX’s Boca Chica, TX testing facility.

The systems on Starhopper are designed to be smaller-scale versions of the technologies that will go into Starship. SpaceX’s space-liner will eventually carry up to 100 people into space if Elon Musk’s vision holds true. The tech magnate tweeted about the success last night.

He refers to the Starhopper as a “water tower” because of the craft’s shape. The next step for Starhopper will be a 200m hop, which is scheduled for sometime next week. Be sure to check back for details.

SpaceX Succeeds with Falcon 9 Launch, Too

In another first for SpaceX, a twice-used Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral. Engineers at SpaceX designed the Falcon 9 to handle ten missions before it needs refurbishment. The success of this launch bodes well for that claim.

The cargo mission, originally slated for yesterday, carries about 5000 lbs of scientific equipment. That equipment includes the famous Nickelodeon slime, as well as a new International Docking Adapter (IDA). The IDA allows a number of American different commercial craft to dock with the space station. It also accommodates international craft.  

NASA is depending on SpaceX, Boeing, and a number of other private firms to get us into space now. Therefore, when SpaceX succeeds, we all succeed. As hard as it is for me to be a cheerleader for a $20 billion company, here’s hoping next week goes just as well for them. 

Brandon Humphreys

Brandon Humphreys

I'm a wizard. I write stuff and it goes from my head into yours - Magic! Apart from that, I am the Senior Editor for Space Porn, a veteran, a rock guitarist, and a teacher.

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